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A THOUSAND CHANNELS

Episode Zero

PART 1

Madhavi Menon reads the first part of a fable, excerpted from ‘Universalism and Partition: A Queer Theory’, first published in Differences 26 no.1 (2015): 117.

Archival clip from India – the Brightest Jewel (1977), BBC TV and Films Incorporated. Source: www.archive.org

Syma Tariq introduces Operation Legacy, and questions the discursive violence left after the destruction of colonial archives. Music by Mo Dafa.

Tour of Ratan Talao gurdwara on Preedy Street, Karachi, Pakistan, conducted by artist-researcher Shahana Rajani on 29 October 2019. A gurdwara (meaning ‘door to the guru’) is a Sikh site of assembly and place of worship.

Syma Tariq discusses the hidden documents of Hanslope Park, owned by the UK National Archives, and the statue of Major General Henry Havelock in Trafalgar Square, London. Music by Mo Dafa.

Interview with Khalid Farid, the author’s maternal great uncle (‘nana abu’), recorded on 27 September 2019. Incidentally, there is a small replica Trafalgar Square in Bahria Town.

A quote from Nikita Dhawan’s ‘Hegemonic Listening and Subversive Silences: Ethical-political Imperatives’. Critical Studies 36, (2016): 59. A note on listening. Music by Mo Dafa.

Shahana continues to speak about what happened at Ratan Talao

Madhavi Menon reads the second part of a fable, excerpted from ‘Universalism and Partition: A Queer Theory’, first published in Differences 26 no.1 (2015): 117.

• Military fanfare


This work forms the first of a three-part audio-essay by Syma Tariq that takes the 1947 Partition as a sonic environment. Commissioned for Nottingham Contemporary’s public programme Sonic Continuum

PART 2

Night-time recording of a road in Ella, a Sri Lankan village 2,000 metres above sea level


Sohini Basak reading her poem, ‘Sometimes You Dream of Wolves Not Foxes’. 


John Akomfrah on the relationship of the postcolonial to its subject in his work titled Transfigured Night. From the After Year Zero series, Courtesy Anselm Franke and HKW
 

An excerpt from Pedro Gómez-Egaña’s work Vimana Kiranaavarta Observatory. The piece refers to Edgar Allan Poe’s “A Descent Into the Maelstrom” 1841, R.L Brohier’s “The Changing Face of Colombo”, and Colombo's Komapana Veediya neighborhood. It also refers to the “Vimana Shastra", a text written in the early 20th century that claims to reveal the engineering behind the mystical flying machines of Southern Asia called Vimanas.
 

Boats head towards ‘Zalzala Jazeera’, an island that emerged after an earthquake that erupted off the Gwadar coast of Pakistan in 2013, as it emits methane gas.
 

The Mymensingh Highway, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
 

Architect Marina Tabassum on her own memories of rivers and relationship to water, and an explanation of the dual – upward and subterranean - nature of her project, Dhaka’s Museum of Independence, which took seventeen years to complete.
 

Musicians Noor Zehra and Beena Raza play “Bilawal (Jugalbandi)” on the Sagar Veena, a new addition to the existing variety of stringed instruments for playing North Indian classical music. “Sagar” is a Sanskrit word for ocean, while “Veena” a generic term used to classify the family of stringed instruments. Courtesy Sanjan Nagar Institute, Lahore
 

Jagath Weerasinghe on the archaeological approach in his work and national context, and notes on a new project, ‘Memory in Groundedness’.

This work was originally featured in the 2015 iteration of A Thousand Channels, as part of the Ancestors travelling public programme. All four episodes can be listened to here

PART 3

Protest against Colombo Port City Project. In January 2016, hundreds of people from civic society organisations, including NAFSO (National Fisheries Solidarity Organization) and Sri Vimukthi (fisher women liberation), gathered in Colombo to protest against the destructive effects of the project. Video recording available on the FB group, Stop Colombo Port City.

Collage of sounds made from the corporate presentations of Port City Colombo. The corporation developing the project is part of CCCC – China Communications Construction Company Limited; it is developed according to a joint initiative with the government of Sri Lanka, and it is also part of the new Silk Road (One Belt One Road Initiative).

Herman Kumara (founder of NAFSO) December 2019, Negombo. He exposes the incredibly damaging impacts of sand mining on the livelihood and built environment of the coastal communities along the western Sri Lanka coast.

Sound recording from Negombo fish market. Early morning, December 2019

Subashini Deepa, coordinator of Sri Vimukthi, speaks in Negombo in December 2019 about the increasing difficulties experienced by fishing families that she monitors, and the construction of women’s leadership in the struggle against Colombo Port City. She also introduces us to a fisherman from Negombo, who talks about decreasing fish catches . 

Herman Kumara contextualizes Colombo Port City project into a larger frame of economic transnational interests, mentioning the possible land regimes and legal system that can emerge from reclaimed land, and the consequence of sovereignty questions that arise from it. 

Voices of women from Sri Vimukthi taking part to a demonstration against the Colombo Port City project, in Colombo, July 2018.

This work was originally commissioned by Karachi Beach Radio

PART 4

Protest against Colombo Port City Project. In January 2016, hundreds of people from civic society organisations, including NAFSO (National Fisheries Solidarity Organization) and Sri Vimukthi (fisher women liberation), gathered in Colombo to protest against the destructive effects of the project. Video recording available on the FB group, Stop Colombo Port City.

Collage of sounds made from the corporate presentations of Port City Colombo. The corporation developing the project is part of CCCC – China Communications Construction Company Limited; it is developed according to a joint initiative with the government of Sri Lanka, and it is also part of the new Silk Road (One Belt One Road Initiative).

Herman Kumara (founder of NAFSO) December 2019, Negombo. He exposes the incredibly damaging impacts of sand mining on the livelihood and built environment of the coastal communities along the western Sri Lanka coast.

Sound recording from Negombo fish market. Early morning, December 2019

Subashini Deepa, coordinator of Sri Vimukthi, speaks in Negombo in December 2019 about the increasing difficulties experienced by fishing families that she monitors, and the construction of women’s leadership in the struggle against Colombo Port City. She also introduces us to a fisherman from Negombo, who talks about decreasing fish catches . 

Herman Kumara contextualizes Colombo Port City project into a larger frame of economic transnational interests, mentioning the possible land regimes and legal system that can emerge from reclaimed land, and the consequence of sovereignty questions that arise from it. 

Voices of women from Sri Vimukthi taking part to a demonstration against the Colombo Port City project, in Colombo, July 2018.

This work was originally commissioned by Karachi Beach Radio

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